While all aspects of life in the greater New Orleans area were affected by the storm, education became a central linchpin of a post-Katrina recovery and reconstruction project predicated on privatization and market-experimentation.

 

EDUCATION IN NEW ORLEANS: A DECADE AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA (Vol. 17 #3/4)

EDITORS:
Prudence Browne,
University of Illinois at Chicago
Cedric Johnson,
University of Illinois at Chicago

This issue features contributions rooted in the robust history and culture of New Orleans’ black community and it’s ongoing struggles for equitable public schools, culturally relevant teaching, and self-determination. Here, critical analyses from scholars, cultural practitioners and activist of the effects of current reforms in New Orleans and help to illuminate the implications for black education writ large. While education is the central theme for this special issue, themes exploring arts in school, effects of gentrification, and the history of race, gender, and political organizing and activism helps to round out the issue as well as contributions that draw connections between local, state, national, and global policies.